astudyinawesome:

I’m crying

Micro Rant About College and Society

You know it wasn’t all that long ago where if you had a high school diploma, it actually meant something. It meant that you were educated, and that you could go on to get a job, and be a productive member of society. Now, what does it mean? It’s basically a ticket stub, ‘Admit One to Six Figure Student Loan Debt’ is what I see when I look at what I went to school and worked to obtain. Yes, high school isn’t actually that hard, but lets be honest here, it’s basically a liberal arts degree.. Today, what do you need to be successful? Well if you’re feeling brave, you’ll only go to a 2-year institution, and obtain an associates degree in a particular field, and hope that somebody still will hire you, who decided to only go through 2 more years of school after High School, and get a bit of real world experience. But if you want to be confident that you’ll get a job after graduation*, you’ll go to a 4-year school or program, and obtain a bachelors degree in something. (* Confidence in finding a job is that there’s at least a 50% shot that you’ll actually find something in your field, but who the hell actually knows). Now if you’re actually interested, and really wanna find a job, or just have no clue what the hell you ACTUALLY want to do after you graduate, you’ll go back for a masters or doctorate in whatever you decided to waste a whole bunch of time learning about in a classroom, but not doing, and getting that hands on experience that you actually need, to learn what you’re actually doing. When did society get to the point where every single person out there needs to spend the best parts of their lives sitting at a desk being told about the outside world, instead of experiencing it? 

Sincerely,

One Pissed Off College Student who’s had enough..

cerebralzero:

naplestan:

#bananaclip #chiquita #banana #nra #2a. #gunrights

Haha yes!

cerebralzero:

naplestan:

#bananaclip #chiquita #banana #nra #2a. #gunrights

Haha yes!

(via rtrixie)

funnynhilariousgif:

Literally nope. »
funnynhilariousgif:

Let us not forget the cat riding a Roomba in a shark costume »

Heres for the relaunch! Now that spring is almost over, and summer is almost upon us, I want to relaunch this more along the photography lines.. In particular the film lines. If you’ve followed me for a while you’ve probably realized (at this point) that I am a nut about some things.. I am an amateur radio nut, love scifi and stuff, but one thing in particular I am getting more and more into, and that is film photography. Especially the old instants. When at the Dayton Hamfest this year, I purchased a Polaroid Automatic Land 100 that I’ll get some shots on, as soon as the film and battery arrive for that.. Until then, here is a shot using a Polaroid Impulse, using impossible project 600 film. Taking nature shots with those are difficult, because that is not the intent of a Polaroid necessarily, but I’m trying to make it work. The other two are taken using a Polaroid 300, which is pretty much the same camera as the Fujifilm Instax, however it has been noted that the Polaroid film is made to a higher grade than the Fuji. When I get a chance, I’ll pick up a pack, and do a comparison. But until then, I hope you enjoy some of the stuff coming this way, and possibly to a blog off of the Tumblrverse..

New stuff coming in a matter of hours: stay tuned!

wayoradio:

In honor of tomorrow night’s tribute to Weezer’s ‘Blue Album’ at the Bug Jar (full details HERE), Hayden Ford wrote a bit about his experience with the album, what it means (and continues to mean) to him, and how it’s okay not to be cool. His band, The Skirts (along with Secret Pizza and Department), will also be performing tomorrow night. Be sure to come check out the show, and read up!
***********
When you’re not cool you have to find ways of getting through the day. You find ways to cope with your awkwardness, to quell your social anxiety, to stifle your insecurities. Different people have different strategies, some turn to hurting others, some begin hurting themselves, and others find a way to leave altogether. This is what I did: I became an avid day dreamer. Whether it was fantasies of climbing buildings as Spider-Man, or digging an underground passageway to another part of the continent, or building a castle in my bedroom, much of my young life was spent staring off into space, reveling in the freedom that escapism offers.
I like to think that Rivers Cuomo was a daydreamer, too. His songs on the ‘Blue Album’ are often surreal, but hardly absurd. They have a nebulous, not-all-there quality to them. The lyrics, while coherent, aren’t always sensible; the guitars fuzzy but still ethereal. Songs like “The World Has Turned and Left Me Here” convey an easily identifiable longing for someone who doesn’t love you back. I get the feeling, however, that Rivers is more in love with the idea of his crush than the crush herself. This love of abstractions is a theme that remains consistent throughout the album. Songs like “Holiday” present a quintessential escapist fantasy, while “Only In Dreams” is a woozy ode to another intangible romance. Despite this almost childish idealism and naivete that Rivers cultivates throughout the album, there also exists a streak of anxiety. Gloomy musical and lyrical undertones coarse throughout each song, as if to remind us of the dark side of becoming too preoccupied in fantasy: that while shutting yourself off in the garage may offer comfort, it comes at the price of further alienation from the outside world.
For me, however, the most important aspect of the ‘Blue Album’ wasn’t musical. It was in the way Rivers, and the rest of the band, looked and acted. The album was an existential companion to my life, a reassurance that it was, in fact, okay not to be cool. Whenever I felt like shit for not being able to play sports, whenever I wanted to join a school play, whenever I sang in chorus or drew pictures, whenever I felt the desire to read and write and learn and be excited about it, whenever I felt like I wasn’t being tough or manly enough, I could turn to the ‘Blue Album’. Weezer became my frame of reference. They were the coolest band ever, but they weren’t cool at all. They made it acceptable to say fuck it, and do whatever I wanted to do. For this reason I still maintain that they were more punk than any hardcore band I slam-danced to in high school.
They were noticeably apolitical, but for me their existence had increasingly political implications. It got me thinking, if rock and roll can be for ners, where are the other people who look and act different? Why was rock and roll still filled with macho posturing that I couldn’t identify with? Where are the women? Where are the queer people? What about minorities? These are questions that I don’t think Weezer meant to ask, but by making a weirdo like me feel included, I couldn’t help but wonder how many other people rock and roll is leaving out, how many others could benefit by its emotional catharsis, its promise of negotiating escapism with reality, its ability to give outsiders a voice? These are questions that I hear every time I listen to the ‘Blue Album’, questions that we should still be asking ourselves.

wayoradio:

In honor of tomorrow night’s tribute to Weezer’s ‘Blue Album’ at the Bug Jar (full details HERE), Hayden Ford wrote a bit about his experience with the album, what it means (and continues to mean) to him, and how it’s okay not to be cool. His band, The Skirts (along with Secret Pizza and Department), will also be performing tomorrow night. Be sure to come check out the show, and read up!

***********

When you’re not cool you have to find ways of getting through the day. You find ways to cope with your awkwardness, to quell your social anxiety, to stifle your insecurities. Different people have different strategies, some turn to hurting others, some begin hurting themselves, and others find a way to leave altogether. This is what I did: I became an avid day dreamer. Whether it was fantasies of climbing buildings as Spider-Man, or digging an underground passageway to another part of the continent, or building a castle in my bedroom, much of my young life was spent staring off into space, reveling in the freedom that escapism offers.

I like to think that Rivers Cuomo was a daydreamer, too. His songs on the ‘Blue Album’ are often surreal, but hardly absurd. They have a nebulous, not-all-there quality to them. The lyrics, while coherent, aren’t always sensible; the guitars fuzzy but still ethereal. Songs like “The World Has Turned and Left Me Here” convey an easily identifiable longing for someone who doesn’t love you back. I get the feeling, however, that Rivers is more in love with the idea of his crush than the crush herself. This love of abstractions is a theme that remains consistent throughout the album. Songs like “Holiday” present a quintessential escapist fantasy, while “Only In Dreams” is a woozy ode to another intangible romance. Despite this almost childish idealism and naivete that Rivers cultivates throughout the album, there also exists a streak of anxiety. Gloomy musical and lyrical undertones coarse throughout each song, as if to remind us of the dark side of becoming too preoccupied in fantasy: that while shutting yourself off in the garage may offer comfort, it comes at the price of further alienation from the outside world.

For me, however, the most important aspect of the ‘Blue Album’ wasn’t musical. It was in the way Rivers, and the rest of the band, looked and acted. The album was an existential companion to my life, a reassurance that it was, in fact, okay not to be cool. Whenever I felt like shit for not being able to play sports, whenever I wanted to join a school play, whenever I sang in chorus or drew pictures, whenever I felt the desire to read and write and learn and be excited about it, whenever I felt like I wasn’t being tough or manly enough, I could turn to the ‘Blue Album’. Weezer became my frame of reference. They were the coolest band ever, but they weren’t cool at all. They made it acceptable to say fuck it, and do whatever I wanted to do. For this reason I still maintain that they were more punk than any hardcore band I slam-danced to in high school.

They were noticeably apolitical, but for me their existence had increasingly political implications. It got me thinking, if rock and roll can be for ners, where are the other people who look and act different? Why was rock and roll still filled with macho posturing that I couldn’t identify with? Where are the women? Where are the queer people? What about minorities? These are questions that I don’t think Weezer meant to ask, but by making a weirdo like me feel included, I couldn’t help but wonder how many other people rock and roll is leaving out, how many others could benefit by its emotional catharsis, its promise of negotiating escapism with reality, its ability to give outsiders a voice? These are questions that I hear every time I listen to the ‘Blue Album’, questions that we should still be asking ourselves.